Myanmar Speaker Series: Can Decentralization Improve Education in Myanmar ?

October 1, 2020

Following the start of the country’s various reforms in 2011, public funding for education has significantly increased, leading to an important rise in access. The primary net enrollment rate increased from 88% in 2009-10 to 93 percent in 2014-15. Net enrollment in pre-primary education saw an impressive growth between 2008 – when roughly 1 in 20 children were enrolled – and 2014 when nearly 1 in 4 children were enrolled. The National Education Strategic Plan (NESP) 2016-21 represents an important milestone for education in Myanmar, as the country’s very first education sector plan in the context of a major transition towards democracy.

(more…)

Continue ReadingMyanmar Speaker Series: Can Decentralization Improve Education in Myanmar ?

Myanmar Speaker Series: What Does the Latest Peace Conference Mean for Myanmar? An Update

September 23, 2020.

The Government of Myanmar and the Ethnic Armed Organizations are key parties to a formal Peace Process. They have been negotiating ‘basic federal as well as democratic’ principles for the country. In October 2015, all parties agreed that these principles would constitute the Union Accord, the basis to amend all laws–including the 2008 Constitution. Under the current government (2015-2020), no major constitutional change has taken place. The Peace Process remains the most plausible path to amend the constitution, end the armed conflict and lead to a multi-ethnic, federal and democratic Myanmar.

(more…)

Continue ReadingMyanmar Speaker Series: What Does the Latest Peace Conference Mean for Myanmar? An Update

Myanmar Speaker Series: Women and Conflict in Myanmar Can elections bring a relief?

Myanmar is home to several minority ethnic groups seeking political, economic, cultural, and social recognition. In these pursuits, conflict has erupted and sustained for decades–as one of the world’s longest–manifesting in a variety of forms. Within these conflicts, the gendered impacts are multi-faceted and disproportionately tolling upon women and girls. As Myanmar heads to the polls again this year, violence could again re-emerge, keeping in mind that “Gender inequities exacerbate experiences of conflict, and responses that do not incorporate gender analysis exacerbate inequities”.

(more…)

Continue ReadingMyanmar Speaker Series: Women and Conflict in Myanmar Can elections bring a relief?

Myanmar Speaker Series: Will 2020 Elections Increase Myanmar’s Decentralization?

June 17, 2020. Dr. Alex Pelletier & Dr. Jacques Bertrand.

Myanmar’s 2008 Constitution established a more decentralized structure, with partially elected sub-national governments with new financial and administrative functions. Since the 2011 transition and the 2015 civilian-led rule, the Myanmar government continues the working with the 2008 Constitution–rather than replacing it—while pledging to decentralize key areas of policy to local and state governments. As the 2020 election looms now in the horizon, it is time to take stock of how decentralization has advanced in the country.

(more…)

Continue ReadingMyanmar Speaker Series: Will 2020 Elections Increase Myanmar’s Decentralization?

Myanmar Speaker Series: What does the Peace process mean for Myanmar Elections?

The government of Myanmar and the Ethnic Armed Organizations are key parties to a formal Peace Process. They are negotiating ‘basic federal as well as democratic’ principles for the country. In October 2015, all parties agreed that these principles would constitute the Union Accord, the basis to amend all laws–including the 2008 Constitution. Under the current government (2015-2020), no major constitutional change has taken place. The Peace Process remains the most plausible path to amend the constitution, end the armed conflict and lead to a multi-ethnic, federal and democratic Myanmar.

(more…)

Continue ReadingMyanmar Speaker Series: What does the Peace process mean for Myanmar Elections?